What You Need to Know about HR Trends in the Digital Age – Part 1

It won’t come as a surprise to today’s business and HR leaders that the title of Deloitte’s recently released, fifth annual Global Human Capital Trends report and survey is “Rewriting the Rules for the Digital Age.” As the report highlights, the present-day workforce is undergoing a seismic shift as a result of dramatic advances in digital technology. This shift has called into question the hows and whys of almost every organizational practice. As a result, business and HR leaders all over the world are having to look beyond old operational paradigms and embrace bold new ways of thinking about their organizations, their people, and their role in the global economy.

For HR leaders struggling with how best to adapt to this dramatically changing landscape, the Deloitte report is an instructive read. Full of insights gathered from more than 10,000 survey respondents in 140 countries, the report presents 10 of the most important trends impacting HR in the digital age, and offers helpful suggestions for leaders on how to incorporate these trends into their workplaces. Read on for a look at the top four of these trends.

  1. Building the organization of the future.

What’s it about?—The question of how to build the organization of the future has topped Deloitte’s list of trends for the past two years. This year, nearly 90% of all survey respondents rated this issue as “important” or “very important.” It’s easy to understand why this is such a priority when we consider not only that today’s high-performing organizations operate very differently than they did even just a decade earlier, but also that many organizations still operate based on industrial-age models that were developed a century or more ago. Consequently, abandoning cumbersome legacy systems and practices is a pressing concern for most businesses today, especially given the rapid pace of transformation and adaptation in the digital change.

organization chart

Where can businesses start?—There are a number of early steps that businesses can take to start down the road of building the organization of the future. These include making talent mobility a core value, which can be accomplished by moving executives from function to function so that they gain a deeper understanding of a more agile career model. Other strategies involve forming an organizational performance group to interview and study how high-performing teams and programs work, and leveraging new workplace communication tools like Slack or Basecamp to foster greater collaboration and exchange.

  1. Careers and learning.

What’s it about?—The very notion of what a “career” is has changed significantly in recent years. Today, the career of the average worker could span up to 60 years, with the average stay in a single job or role lasting between four and five years. In other words, today’s workers will be looking to continually reinvent themselves, move from role to role, and find or transform their calling over time. If businesses want to make the most of their employees’ skills, they are going to have to support them through this ongoing process by delivering continuous learning opportunities and a business culture that deeply values long-term development.

Where can businesses start?—HR leaders looking to revamp learning and development (L&D) within their organizations have a challenging task ahead, but small initial actions can help pave the way. First, it’s helpful to evaluate internal mobility to ensure that employees have frequent access to new opportunities. Hiring from within is also important, as is bringing back the idea of the “corporate university” where people can come together for cross-functional, interdisciplinary programs and learning experiences.

  1. Talent acquisition.

personnel hiring

What’s it about?—Identified as an important or very important issue by 81% of Deloitte survey respondents, talent acquisition is a challenging and contentious area in this age of talent and skill shortages. Interestingly, it has become so important for companies to find the right people for the job that attracting skilled resources is no longer the responsibility of HR alone. Instead, all managers and C-level executives are now realizing the importance of, and their role in, sourcing top talent.

Where can businesses start?—One of the most important ways that businesses can change their approach to talent acquisition is by changing the tools they use to find and connect with candidates. Recruiting today is a sophisticated digital experience, requiring businesses to explore a range of approaches, including social networks, cognitive tools, and video and gaming, in their hunt for great people.

  1. The employee experience.

What’s it about?—Just as digital-age customers have come to expect a different level of experience from the organizations they buy products and services from, employees have come to expect a different kind of workplace experience during their tenure with a company. As a result, more and more businesses are focusing on long-term employee journeys, looking at the needs of their workforce from the first pre-interview contact through retirement and beyond. These companies are finding new ways to reshape the employee experience through broad culture and engagement initiatives.

Where can businesses start?—A holistic approach is needed when it comes to revamping the employee experience. Businesses can start by recognizing that the employee experience is as valuable and can make as much of an impact as the customer experience. Then, they can move on to specific strategies like finding ways to simplify work and improve productivity; visiting peer companies to gain inspiration and discover successful and unsuccessful techniques; and gaining critical buy-in from the C-suite.

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