What You Need to Know about HR Trends in the Digital Age – Part 2

Our exploration of how the rules of HR are changing in the digital age continues with six more trends from Deloitte’s 2017 Global Human Capital Trends report and survey.

  1. Performance management.

What’s it about?—It’s a simple truth that as the nature of work shifts, so should the way we measure and evaluate it. In recent years, companies have been experimenting more with performance management approaches that turn away from simple appraisals in favor of continuous feedback and coaching. This year, according to the Deloitte survey, companies are finishing their experiments and moving toward the deployment of new performance management models on a wide scale. So far, these changes are greatly helping to increase productivity and shift corporate culture.

business management

Where can businesses start?—Though more and more businesses are changing how they measure, evaluate, and recognize employee performance, new tools are not yet in place at every organization. Companies looking to capitalize on this trend should clearly designate a strategy and philosophy for performance management; look to their peers to see new techniques in action; and focus on providing training to managers in coaching and continuous feedback.

  1. Pushing the boundaries of leadership.

What’s it about?—Today’s rapidly transforming companies need strong leaders more than ever, and yet most organizations are having difficulty moving quickly enough to develop digital leaders with the necessary skills and expertise, let alone build completely new leadership models. As a result, the boundaries of traditional leadership hierarchies are being dramatically disrupted, and more agile, diverse, and younger leaders are emerging—sometimes from unexpected places—to take the reins at their companies.

Where can businesses start?—Challenges to the leadership model can be stressful for long-established organizations, but it’s important for companies to embrace this new direction in order to move forward. Businesses should be bold in coming up with a new vision for the organization’s leadership model. In addition, they should not be afraid of identifying prospective digital leaders within the company and promoting younger or newer workers into leadership positions quickly.

  1. Digital HR.

What’s it about?—No longer a siloed support function focused on delivering employee services, HR is, in many organizations, at the forefront of digital transformation. The push to “be digital” rather than just to “do digital” is driving the development of a new digital workforce, a more effectively designed digital workplace, and a digital HR function that not only delivers solutions, but continuously experiments and innovates. In other words, it’s not simply a question of digitizing HR platforms—rather, it’s about helping change how people work and how they interact with each other in the workplace.

Where can businesses start?—Fortunately, the path to digital HR is rapidly becoming clearer as expanded options and new platforms and tools gain a greater hold in the business world. Organizations can start down this path by upgrading core technology; developing a multi-year HR technology strategy and building a dedicated digital HR team; and prioritizing innovation as a core strategy within HR.

  1. People analytics.

What’s it about?—Data about people at work is of vital importance today, and not just to specialized technical data scientists, but as a step to achieving broad business objectives and efficiencies. When used properly, people analytics can impact everything from operations and management to financial performance. However, many businesses lack the readiness and expertise to optimize the use of this data and transform it into actionable insights.

analytics personnel

Where can businesses start?—Clear leadership and targeted investment can help businesses make a successful people analytics program part of their operations. Making a two- to three-year roadmap for analytics program investment is a good place to start, as is the establishment of a multidisciplinary group from across the organization to outline and understand the broadest possible uses of people data.

  1. Diversity and inclusion.

What’s it about?—All around the world, diversity and inclusion are now CEO-level issues. No longer a “check the box” initiative driven by HR, diversity is an essential element to the digital organization of today, which thrives on open dialogue, collaboration, and complementary working styles. To be most effective, diversity and inclusion should be a comprehensive strategy woven into the very fabric of the talent life cycle, where it can enhance employee engagement, boost the brand, and drive performance improvements.

Where can businesses start?—There is still a “reality gap” between the importance that organizations place on diversity and inclusion, and what’s happening on the ground. Businesses can shrink this gap by leveraging data to look at the facts, identify problems, and measure progress, as well as by providing education initiatives like unconscious bias training. The goal is to build an awareness of diversity into the entire workforce, including management.

  1. The augmented workforce.

What’s it about?—AI systems, robotics, and other cognitive tools and technology are reinventing almost every job, a process that is leading to something that has been dubbed the “augmented workforce.” As this trend picks up speed, organizations must consider how they will design jobs and organize work in the future with people and robots working side by side. The days of considering the workforce to be only those employees on the balance sheet are over.

Where can businesses start?—To understand how new cognitive technologies could change the fabric of their workforce, companies must have a clear and comprehensive understanding of what the picture looks like now. Essential tasks for companies to complete include closely examining how core work actually gets done; identifying all human workforce segments within the company; looking at all types of nonhuman workforces currently in play; and determining what human skills will be critical for the future workforce.

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